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May 23, 2018
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Turkish TV Reporter Visits Gaza Market and Mosque in Ramadan

#6595 | 03:03
Source: TRT World (Turkey)
In a show that aired on the Turkish TRT World TV channel on May 23, a reporter takes us to the Hasseina Mosque and through the Souk Al-Zawya in Gaza, showing the goods on display and praising the "Ramadan vibes," the spicy pickles, and a carob beverage, which is "so refreshing when you come to break your fast."

 

Following is a transcript: 

Reporter: So look around you. It’s Ramadan vibes everywhere. We’re here in the Souk ِAl-Zawya, which is the central marketplace in Gaza, and as you see it’s [packed]. Everyone is running around trying to buy some last minute supplies to break their fast. 

[Stops in front of a bowl of pickles] 

Spicy! 

Palestinians in Gaza like two things so much in Ramadan. The first one is mukhallalat, basically olives, chilies, anything that adds a little bit of spice to the food. And I know it must sound crazy, right? You are not eating all day but you add a little spice, but welcome to Gaza, fam. And the next one is kharroub (carob). Let me take you to the kharroub

So guys, ten minutes left, and the race for the kharroub starts. As you can see here, it looks like Coca Cola, but it tastes nothing like it. It’s nice, it’s sweet, and it’s so refreshing when you come to break your fast. 

Kharroub seller: No. 

Reporter: No, it’s not sweet? 

Kharroub seller: Yes. 

Reporter: These guys have very kindly offered us some food to break our fast. It’s me here and Youssef. And Ramadan kareem. 

[The muezzin calls] 

I just want to say something. The people here of Gaza, despite all the problems, despite all the shortages, are the kindest people. 

The streets are empty – no cars, no people here on the main coastal road of Gaza. Everybody is at home, eating away. So we’ll catch up with you in a couple of hours in the night prayers, where everyone is going to hit the mosques. 

[Later at the mosque] 

We are here outside the beautiful Hasseina Mosque in Gaza. As you see, the little children are putting out the mats because it’s [packed]. There won’t be any space inside very soon. We’ll see everyone here making their prayers [and] try to talk to them a bit. 

Mosque-goer: Ramadan kareem. There are a lot of blessings. It’s a great month. 

Reporter: Are there problems here in Ramadan because of the siege? 

Mosque-goer: [In] Ramadan kareem there is no problem, even with the siege. There is no problem. It doesn’t matter. Worship is worship, fasting is fasting, praying is praying. Thank God. 

Reporter: Peace be upon you, Ramadan kareem. How are you guys? Can you tell me what Ramadan means to you? 

Young man: Ramadan is the month of worship, month of obedience, the month of forgiveness, the month of mercy. During Ramadan the environment is very nice here in Gaza. There are a lot of things that are different than other months. 

[After praying in the mosque] 

Reporter: Everybody is leaving the mosque as the night prayers, or taraweeh as they call them in Arabic, come to an end. Everyone is going to go now [and] find something to eat. Ramadan kareem, and peace and love from Gaza. 

[…] 

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