memri

September 7, 2019
Clip No.
7464

Sudanese Religious Affairs Minister Nasr Al-Din Mufreh Invites Jews Who Have Left Sudan to Return, Reclaim Their Citizenship

Nasr Al-Din Mufreh, Sudan's Minister of Religious Affairs, said in a September 7, 2019 interview on Al-Arabiya Network (Saudi Arabia) that Sudan is pluralistic in its views, values, cultures, ideologies, Islamic schools of thought, and religions, and he called upon Jewish minorities that may have left Sudan to reclaim their Sudanese citizenship and return to the country, which he pointed out is now ruled by secular law. On a same-day interview on Sudania 24 TV, Sudanese writer Haidar Al-Mukashafi said that the Jewish presence in Sudan dates back over a century, and he said that this may be evidenced by a rumor in the Sudanese city of Merow that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was born and raised in Sudan. Al-Mukashafi said that Jews and other minorities may return to Sudan if reforms take place and if there are incentives to do so.

Following are excerpts:

 

Nasr Al-Din Mufreh on Al-Arabiya Network: Sudan is pluralistic in its views, its values, and its cultures. It is pluralistic in its ideologies and its Islamic schools of thought, and it is pluralistic even in its religions. We have Islam and Christianity, and there were Jewish minorities that may have left the country. I'd like to take this opportunity to call upon them to reclaim their right to citizenship. I call upon them to return to this country. Since Sudan [has become] a country rules by secular law, citizenship is the basis for rights and duties.

 

[…]

 

Haidar Al-Mukashafi on Sudania 24 TV: The Jewish presence in Sudan is very old, and perhaps dates back over a century.

[…]

 

There is a quaint story being told in the city of Merowe. There is a rumor there that Benjamin Netanyahu was born and raised in Sudan. They say that he was born in the city of Nuri, in the northern state of Sudan, and that he was raised there. In any case, this is proof that there was a Jewish presence, at least in Merowe.

 

[…]

 

But why would they return? The Sudanese [Jews] emigrated for different reasons. The country had rejected them. They have no reason to return unless there are reforms in the country, and unless there are incentives for Sudanese Jews or non-Jews to return.