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Nov 27, 2019
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Russian TV Anchor Dmitry Kiselev Criticizes Hollywood For Promoting 'Gender' As A New Ideology That Advocates For The Suppression Of Men

#7655 | 04:47
Source: Russia 1

In his commentary for Vesti Nedeli on Rossiya-1 TV (Russia), pro-Kremlin presenter Dmitry Kiselev criticized gender politics in Hollywood. "In this regard: women shoot and women judge. From now on, everything should consist of at least 50% women, according to the order. That is, gender becomes the number one issue," Kiselev stressed.

 

Kiselev then commented on the new 2019 Hollywood action movie "Charlie's Angels", written and directed by Elizabeth Banks, stating that this new installment in the Charlie's Angels film series shows how gender politics ruined the quality of movies. Kiselev stated: "[The previous Charlie's Angels movies] were successful and popular comedy movie projects created by mean for men and for women. And then a woman got down to business. I wouldn't stress it if Elizabeth Banks herself didn't emphasize her gender and nonstandard orientation. And what's the result? Today's Charlie's Angels features a lesbian heroine played by Kristen Stewart, a true lesbian... When it comes to men, according to the script, they are either villains or morons. The women [i.e. the three Charlie's Angels] brutally deal with them during the film, by either killing them or by cynically using them... It isn't funny, but brutally serious. The women are at work. Their work is to punish men."

 

Kiselev concluded stating that the movie was a flop in Russia and in the entire world. He then stressed that, nevertheless, Elizabeth Banks blamed "for her own failure" not herself, but "men". Kilesev said: "Everything's simpler. Men are just people. They don't want to watch a mediocre movie. And if mediocre cinema is filled with lesbians and queers, then this fact alone doesn't make the picture more talented in the eyes of men."

 

He then assessed: "Is it politically incorrect? Probably. But we aren't here for this."

 

The video was translated into English by Vesti.

 

Dmitry Kiselev: "It's now trendy in the West to have a female director shoot a movie. It's also trendy when at least one in two jury members is also a woman. The Cannes Film Festival even formalized the trend and took the proclaimed obligations upon itself in this regard: women shoot and women judge. From now on, everything should consist of at least 50% women, according to the order. That is, gender becomes the number 1 issue. The only thing left to do is to make men buy tickets to see these movies. They don't always have luck doing that. A fresh example is a movie, recently released in Russia, by American actress and now director Elizabeth Banks. This is supposed to be a continuation of Charlie's Angels, a good old story about three beauties that save the world from various misfortunes. It is clear that, at the same time, they get distracted by men, and get into funny stories full of self-irony with them.

"Charlie's Angels of the 70s was a popular series by Ivan Goff and Ben Roberts. At the turn of the millennium, there were two movies made three years apart and having the same plot: no male heroes, but a trinity of sexy young ladies and luxury; a James Bond-style spy action movie. And they were funny. McG was the director. These were successful and popular comedy movie projects created by men for men and for women. And then a woman got down to business.

"I wouldn't stress it if Elizabeth Banks herself didn't emphasize her gender and nonstandard orientation. And what's the result? Today's Charlie's Angels features a lesbian heroine played by Kristen Stewart, a true lesbian."

 

The video then shows a clip from Charlie's Angels (2019).

 

Kristen Stewart: "How does it feel? I see in your face that you liked it."

Naomi Scott: "Yes, I liked it a lot."

Elizabeth Banks: "Let's go."

 

Dmitry Kiselev: "At the same time, there's no self-irony. When it comes to men, according to the script, they're either villains or morons the women brutally deal with during the film by either killing or cynically using them. And there are no romantic stories. It isn't funny but brutally serious. The women are at work. Their work is to punish men.

"The movie, shall we say, didn't stick. It completely flopped in the box office both in Russia and the entire world. Remarkably, who did Elizabeth Banks blame for her own failure? You guessed it – men. She claimed that they're so sexist that they don't want to buy tickets to a movie by a female director. It sounds like total nonsense, but Elizabeth Banks is sticking to it.

"Elizabeth Banks, actress, film director: Look, people have to buy tickets to this movie, too. This movie has to make money. If this movie doesn't make money it reinforces a stereotype in Hollywood that men don't go see women do action movies.

"Just don't think that we're against female directors. There are very successful ones among them both in the West and in Russia. It suffices to name Oscar-winning Sofia Coppola (Lost in Translation) and Kathryn Bigelow (The Hurt Locker), or Russian Tatyana Lioznova (Seventeen Moments of Spring) and Larisa Shepitko (The Ascent). Each of them is the brightest phenomenon in the world of cinema. But none of these women has ever considered their own gender an argument in favor of the fact that people must watch their movies. Everything's simpler. Men are just people. They don't want to watch a mediocre movie. And if mediocre cinema is filled with lesbians and queers, then this fact alone doesn't make the picture more talented in the eyes of men. Is it politically incorrect? Probably. But we aren't here for this."

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