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Sep 02, 2019
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Lebanese Politician Mustapha Allouch: Lebanon Has Been Hijacked by Hizbullah and Suffers from Stockholm Syndrome; Iran Calls the Shots

#7455 | 01:31
Source: Orient News TV (Syrian Opposition)

Mustapha Allouch, a Lebanese politician who is a member of the March 14 Alliance, said in an interview that was uploaded to the Internet by Orient Net that Hizbullah has hijacked Lebanon and the authority to make decisions regarding war and peace in the region. He said that the Lebanese people suffer from Stockholm syndrome since they are sympathizing with and defending Hizbullah, and he stated that everybody in Lebanon knows that Iran and Hizbullah call the shots rather than the Lebanese government and military.

 

Mustapha Allouch: Hizbullah has not only appropriated the [authority to make] decisions about war and peace in Lebanon. It has appropriated the [authority to make] decisions about war and peace anywhere between Iran and the Mediterranean Sea – in Syria, in Iraq, and, of course, in Yemen. The question now is: Where does this all lead? A person who was kidnapped should not be asked for his opinion about his kidnapper. There is no doubt that we are a state that has been hijacked by Hizbullah. What is happening to us is a consequence of this hijacking. The hijacked country is acknowledging [Hizbullah's] right to hijack it. It even defends this hijacking. I believe that us Lebanese people are all suffering from Stockholm syndrome. We have become sympathetic towards our kidnappers. We all know that the Lebanese state and military are not calling the shots here. Decisions begin in Iran and end in Dahieh, Beirut.