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Jun 24, 2017
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Widows of ISIS Fighters: We Were Beaten Up, ISIS Are Infidels

#6107 | 03:28
Source: Alaan TV (UAE)The Internet

In an Alaan TV report, the widows of ISIS fighters, held in a refugee camp after having been caught by the Syrian Democratic Forces while fleeing ISIS, talked of their regrets about having left their home countries to join the Caliphate. Iman, a Tunisian mother of two, recounted how the foreign widows of ISIS fighters are beaten, held in "guest houses," and forced to remarry. The Lebanese Nur Al-Huda said that they had been deceived by Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi, whose soldiers "follow him like sheep." Another Tunisian mother told 7alpress Online that ISIS was killing many Tunisian former members, who had renounced the organization. The two reports aired on June 24 and 26.

 

Voice of reporter:  "ISIS was the absolute ruler in the streets of Al-Raqqah. But things have started to change now, since the beginning of the operation to liberate the city. That is what led many wives of ISIS fighters to try to escape from Al-Raqqah to Turkey. But the Syrian Democratic Forces got hold of them first. Now they are living in small rooms in a refugee camp in the Ayn Issa area. This is Iman, a mother of two, a Tunisian national, and the wife of an ISIS fighter. She says that she was deceived by ISIS, and that she made a big mistake when she left her country for Syria."

 

[…]

 

Iman: "Muhajirat [women who came from abroad] are beaten and forced to marry against their will. For example, when my husband was killed, they took me from my home immediately. They sent me to a "guest house," because I refused to get married again. When I asked them to send me back to my country, they refused. They took my passport and my husband's and burned them."

 

Voice of reporter: "These women live alone in the refugee camp, after their husbands were killed in battle, were arrested [by ISIS], or decided to stay in Al-Raqqah and fight.

 

[…]

 

"Nur Al-Huda, a Lebanese, says that she estimates that there are over 100 Lebanese nationals among the ranks of ISIS. She says that she would sometimes meet, by chance, her Lebanese friends and neighbors in the streets of Al-Raqqah. As for Al-Baghdadi, she says that he deceived them all."

 

Nur Al-Huda: "Do you think that leading the prayer once in Mosul makes you "Emir of the Believers"? I would like to tell his soldiers that they are following him like sheep. They do not know who... He never even talked about belief. How can you follow someone like that? I used to be a sheep just like them, but Allah has opened my eyes.

 

[…]

 

"Before we left Al-Raqqah, we realized that ISIS are infidels. They have wronged many people, including many of their own soldiers."

 

[…]

 

"When we went there, we thought that it was a Caliphate. We thought that it was a Caliphate that follows the guidance of prophethood. We thought that Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi was the Emir of the Believers. We thought that it was an Islamic state governed by the shari'a. That is what we used to think, but when we got there, we realized the truth."

 

[…]

 

ISIS Widow: "My husband discovered that there is a lot of oppression in the Islamic State. He said: This state is not on the right path. We must find a way to run away." A lot of ISIS security personnel were watching the Tunisians closely. Most of the Tunisians who joined ISIS ultimately renounced it. They said that ISIS are oppressors, kill many people, and so on. So they started killing them because they were afraid of a coup. They killed about a hundred of them when we were in Al-Raqqah. There were Algerians and Libyans too, but most of them were Tunisians. The "guest houses" for women were disgraceful. They were beaten and imprisoned there. They would open a hatch in the door just to enter food for her and her children."

 

[…]

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