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Feb 26, 2019
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U.S./Iranian TV Anchor Marzieh Hashemi: I Chant "Death to America" Because Oppressive American System Needs to Change; I Will Not Burn My U.S. Passport Because My Ancestors Owned and Built America

#7064 | 03:53
Source: Channel 5 (Iran)

Press TV (Iran) anchor Marzieh Hashemi, born Melanie Franklin in New Orleans, was interviewed on Channel 5 (Iran) on February 26, 2019. She said that society has reached the point of sex with children and robots because people have no limits. Hashemi said that she chants "Death to America," because the oppressive American system must change. She explained that she had come to that conclusion even before converting to Islam. Hashemi said that she has both black and Native American roots and that she would not burn her American passport because she has the right to that land since "it was our land as reds" and "we built that country as blacks." Iran-based Hashemi recently made headlines when she was arrested by the FBI as a material witness to an undisclosed federal investigation, while visiting the U.S. For mentions of her arrest in Iranian media, see MEMRI TV Clips No. 6951 and No. 6952.

Following are excerpts:

 

Marzieh Hashemi: If you look at the world today, you see where it gets us if we don't set limits or abide by them. We have now reached the point of… Please excuse me… First, there are relations between a boy and a girl, then it's several boys and several girls, then homosexuality, and then, unfortunately, [sex] with children. We have now gotten to the point of relations with robots. Why? Because people have no limits.

 

[…]

 

Interviewer: Mrs. Hashemi, do you participate in the February 11 marches every year?

Marzieh Hashemi: Yes.

Interviewer: One of the slogans we chant in those rallies is "Death to America." Do you also say "Death to America"?

Marzieh Hashemi: Yes, I do.

Interviewer: Isn't it difficult for you?

Marzieh Hashemi: I'll tell you why. Yesterday…

Interviewer: I'd like to explain this to our viewers. It is like if I were to go to any other country, for whatever reason, and say: "Death to Iran!" It's difficult for me.

Marzieh Hashemi: Right.

Interviewer: What got you to the point where you say this without any difficulty?

Marzieh Hashemi: I'd like to explain that even before converting to Islam, I had reached this conclusion. It's not [real] death to America. The system must change. This system causes oppression. My roots are black and red [i.e. Native American]. I have lots of experience. Yesterday, I went to the University of Tehran. More than 20 activists from America came there, and we talked about it. One woman told me I'd better not chant that slogan anymore, since the American public is sensitive. I said it there and I say it here:  I understand this. People usually love their country. But when people here chant this slogan, it's different. People in Iran are dying because of the American policies. In 40 years, many have died because of America's actions. By this slogan, they want to show that they are discontent with America's oppression. I told them that there are people with cancer who cannot get their medicine. People are angry because there is a mother who, God forbid, might lose her child, so she says "death" to the measures that have caused her to lose hr child.

 

[…]

 

Interviewer: So why don't you make a decision and burn your American passport? That's an honest question and I'd like an honest answer.

Marzieh Hashemi: Yes. As I've said I have the right [the keep my passport]. We blacks and reds have built that country. It was our land as reds, and we built that country as blacks. We have a right to [that country]. No. I won't do it. Obviously, I don't know if I will ever be going back, but I won't [burn my passport].

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