Afghan Taliban's Trainer Of Suicide Bombers, Now Afghanistan's Deputy Intelligence Chief, Addresses Relatives Of Deceased Suicide Bombers In Kabul, Promises Government Jobs

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December 10, 2021

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Mullah Tajmir Jawad, the Afghan Taliban's trainer of suicide bombers and now deputy chief of the Afghan intelligence agency General Directorate Of Intelligence (GDI), recently addressed a gathering in Kabul of the family members and children of suicide bombers killed in attacks in Afghanistan. He congratulated the relatives on the "martyrdom" of the bombers and promised the relatives jobs in the Taliban government.

Mullah Tajmir Jawad is also a senior commander of the Haqqani Network – a powerful unit within the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, the Afghan Taliban jihadi organization that seized power in Afghanistan on August 15, 2021. The Haqqani Network has been involved in many terror attacks on Western targets in Afghanistan, including the 2011 bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Kabul.

Audio recordings of Mullah Tajmir Jawad's address and a brief video of the gathering were posted on social media, especially Twitter, by both pro- and anti-Taliban Twitter handles. Gift packages were distributed to the children of the dead suicide bombers at the gathering, at which Mullah Tajmir Jawad congratulated the relatives of the bombers on their "martyrdom" and assured them that the Taliban government would continue to support the bombers' families and relatives.

He said that a central orphanage seminary would be established for the children of suicide bombers, with its branches in different provinces. "Some mujahideen might not have received their right or may not have been given the necessary roles in [government] service. You should be satisfied that efforts are on for you all so that every mujahid can get his right and be engaged in service," he said.

Mullah Tajmir Jawad added: "The Bait-ul-Mal [treasury] might have been misused without permission by military personnel. Most of them might have taken military vehicles and weapons. You should not be upset. They will all be held accountable... All the resources will be collected." He said the relatives of the suicide bombers would be given jobs in the Islamic Emirate government.

Mullah Tajmir Jawad is one of the top Haqqani Network commanders and founder of Al-Hamza Martyrdom Battalion, the Taliban's battalion of suicide bombers. He is between the ages of 45 and 50 and was an intelligence officer in Afghanistan's eastern Nangarhar province during the 1996-2001 Taliban government.

Like other Taliban leaders, Mullah Tajmir Jawad also went into hiding after U.S. invasion overthrew the Taliban government in 2001. He is considered to be an explosives expert and the founder of the system for carrying out suicide attacks in Afghanistan. He lost both his eyes when a bomb went off while he was training fighters in bombmaking. He is from southeastern Afghanistan.

Mullah Tajmir Jawad and another senior Haqqani Network Commander Mullah Sherin were said to be involved in suicide attack on the Kandahar governor's office in 2017 in which five UAE diplomats were also killed.

Speaking at a gathering in Kabul, Mullah Tajmir Jawad said: "Praise be to Allah, the Islamic Emirate is the government of Ulema [Islamic religious scholars] with its leadership in the hands of Ulema; its ministers are Ulema and military leaders are Ulema. The [Taliban] movement, system or the government which is in the hands of Ulema, can never be dented.”

Mullah Tajmir Jawad, who is also a member of the Taliban's Leadership Council, also urged participants in the ceremony to trust the Islamic Emirate leaders. "They have been tested repeatedly over the past 40 years. The struggle of the Ulema against the tyrants has continued for centuries," he said.

 

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