Neo-Nazis, White Supremacists On Facebook, Telegram, 4Chan, Instagram, Gab, React To U.S. Elections, Anticipate Coming 'Civil War'

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November 6, 2020

Neo-nazis and white supremacists are reacting on social media to the U.S. presidential election calling for violence and expressing their expectation that a civil war will erupt.

The following are a sample of reactions to the elections from Election Day to today on Facebook, Telegram, 4Chan, Instagram, Gab, and other platforms. MEMRI DTTM will be releasing a series of reports in the coming days on future reactions.

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4Chan

Another started a betting pool as to how long it will take for Democratic presidential nominee and former vice president Joe Biden to be assassinated or forced to step down. The user provided a bitcoin wallet address.

A user stated that there were no candidates for white people and said that people should stock up on ammunition and stay in shape.

Gab

On November 4 a user wrote that this was the first day of the second American civil war.

In the Gab group a user posted a photo of an official voting ballot with the accelerationist slogan "Voting Will Not Remove Them," and a sonnenrad ("sun wheel"), which is an ancient Indo-European symbol that the Nazis appropriated.

Facebook

On November 3, a user on Facebook posted an image of a rifle and a stack of loaded magazines. He asked his followers if they were all ready.

Telegram

A Telegram channel cited both World Wars as examples of how a few well-placed bullets can make a big difference.

On November 4, a neo-Nazi Telegram channel wrote that Jews are trying to steal the election. The channel posted an image featuring a map of the U.S on fire, and a man and a woman, taken from the cover of the 1978 novel The Turner Diaries,[1] aiming firearms.

A Telegram channel associated with the Boogaloo movement shared an article claiming that a gun store in Indiana had sold a record quantity of ammunition. Other users recommended purchasing ammunition and the construction of military earthworks.

A Telegram channel shared a poster showing a hand dropping a bomb in a ballot box, with the text "Voting Will Not Remove Them."

 

[1] The Turner Diaries is a 1978 novel by William Luther Pierce about a violent overthrow of the U.S. government that leads to a race war and the extermination of non-white races. Pages of the book were found in the car Timothy McVeigh was driving 90 minutes after he carried out the Oklahoma City Bombing in 1995. John William King, one of three men who murdered James Byrd Jr., a disabled black man, in 1998 by chaining him by his ankles to the back of a pickup truck and dragging him for several miles, reportedly said: "We're starting 'the Turner Diaries' early," while dragging Byrd's body behind the truck. The novel is also thought to be the inspiration for the neo-Nazi organization The Order, which had the same name as an organization in the novel, and was responsible for the 1984 murder of Jewish radio host Alan Berg. Cnn.com/US/9704/28/okc, April 28, 1997; Washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/national/longterm/jasper/accused061198.htm, June 13, 1998.

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