European Neo-Nazis Discuss Syrian Civil War With Syrian Nazi Party On Podcast, Blame Middle East Wars On Jews, Call To Unite And Fight Common Enemy: 'We Need To Get Rid Of This Problem [Jews] First'; 'Create Bonds And Work With Non-European Organizations Like The Syrians'; 'Attack It Globally'

print
April 12, 2021

The following report is now a complimentary offering from MEMRI's Domestic Terrorism Threat Monitor (DTTM). For DTTM subscription information, click here.

In late March, a two-hour podcast conference on the war in Syria as livestreamed. The conference brought together European white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and a member of an ultranationalist Syrian party. During the conference, the participants blamed the outbreak of the Syrian civil war on the Gulf countries, the United States, Turkey, Israel, and Jews more broadly. The Europeans in particular emphasized that the war was started in order to create mass migration into Europe with the explicit intent of making whites a minority in their homelands and eventually becoming "extinct."

The podcast was livestreamed on a European neo-Nazi website and social media accounts. The video also appears on the social media channel of one of the other European participants.

YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO THE MEMRI DOMESTIC TERRORISM THREAT MONITOR (DTTM) TO READ THE FULL REPORT. GOVERNMENT AND MEDIA CAN REQUEST A COPY BY WRITING TO [email protected] WITH THE REPORT TITLE IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

Organizer Of The Event

The event was organized by a Dutch white supremacist organization. The organization organizes interviews, podcasts, and conferences and posts opinion pieces on its website. The interviews feature European white supremacist and neo-Nazi organization leaders. Many of these interviews are posted on the organization's social media channels where the group is very active. The organization accepts donations via cryptocurrency including Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Monero.

Participants

Syrian Party

The Syrian party's leader was an admirer of Adolf Hitler and sought training and weapons from Nazi Germany. The party advocates for the creation of greater Syria, encompassing Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Palestine, Iraq, and parts of Turkey and Iran. The group's military wing has fought alongside a Lebanese terrorist group and for the Assad government in the Syrian civil war. It is believed to have between 6,000 and 8,000 members.

The Syrian party has ties to various European groups. A coalition of far-right political activists in Europe has organized a series of trips to Syria where they met with members of the Syrian party. Members of far-right groups from Italy, the U.K, Germany, Spain and Poland have all travelled to Syria and Lebanon where many times they met with the Syrian party.

A picture containing text, indoor, table, conference roomDescription automatically generated
Members of various European extreme right groups meet with members of the Syrian party and representatives of the Syrian government.

A group of people standing in front of a rainbow colored buildingDescription automatically generated with low confidence
Leader of a Polish far right group meets with Hizbullah members.

A group of people standing outside a buildingDescription automatically generated with medium confidence
Italian delegation of a far-right coalition with Syrian soldiers in Damascus

A group of people in a roomDescription automatically generated with low confidence
Belgian far right extremist with Syrian party members

A group of men in suitsDescription automatically generated with medium confidence
Members of a European fascist group in Syria

Nordic Neo-Nazi Party

The leader of a Nordic neo-Nazi group participated in the conference. The individual also posted an article on the organization's webpage explaining the necessity of cooperating with other "nationalist" groups outside of Europe.

A computer screen captureDescription automatically generated with low confidence

U.K Neo-Nazi Group

The leader of a British neo-Nazi group was one of the other participants at the conference. This individual often interacts with white supremacists from different countries and has a history of cooperating with the Dutch organization that coordinated this conference.

A screenshot of a video gameDescription automatically generated with medium confidence

French White Supremacist Group

The leader of a French white supremacist group that seeks the deportation of non-white people from France also participated in the conference.

A black and white checkered surfaceDescription automatically generated with medium confidence

The Conference

The conference began with the Syrian participant arguing that Israel controls the U.S government and played an important role in the outbreak of the Syrian Civil War.

The European neo-Nazis also placed blame on Jews for starting the war arguing that Jews in their home countries shaped public opinion on the war and instigated the conflict in order to create waves of migrants that would flee to their European nations. According to one of the neo-Nazis the Jews were seeking "global domination" and so resolving the "Jewish question" was necessary to halt immigration into Europe and achieve "world peace."

The conference ended with the European neo-Nazis emphasizing that "we all have a common enemy" and that they needed to work together, including with non-European organizations.

The full text of this post is available to DTTM subscribers.

If you are a subscriber, log in here to read this report.

For information on the required credentials to access this material, visit the DTTM subscription page

Subscribe to DTTM

Join U.S. and other Western government agencies and law enforcement, as well as leading businesses and business organizations, in subscribing to the MEMRI Domestic Terrorism Threat Monitor (DTTM) Project, for the latest alerts, updates, and reports on imminent and potential threats from around the world.

ONLY GOVERNMENT, MEDIA, AND ACADEMIA WITH FULL CREDENTIALS CAN REQUEST ACCESS TO DTTM REPORTS.

Subscribe to DTTM

The Cyber & Jihad Lab

The Cyber & Jihad Lab monitors, tracks, translates, researches, and analyzes cyber jihad originating from the Middle East, Iran, South Asia, and North and West Africa. It innovates and experiments with possible solutions for stopping cyber jihad, advancing legislation and initiatives federally – including with Capitol Hill and attorneys-general – and on the state level, to draft and enforce measures that will serve as precedents for further action. It works with leaders in business, law enforcement, academia, and families of terror victims to craft and support efforts and solutions to combat cyber jihad, and recruits, and works with technology industry leaders to craft and support efforts and solutions.

Read More